You are here While you were asleep While you were asleep

While you were asleep

Michael Reid


Michael Reid

Written on Sunday, 25 March 2012 00:00

Like this? Let your friends know!

TENNIS

Samantha Stosur has produced a staggering comeback to set up an enticing US Open final sequel with Serena Williams in Miami.

Stosur recovered from the dead, somehow clawing her way back from 6-2 5-2 down to deny South African Chanelle Scheepers in three sets to reach the last 16.

Australia's world No.5 had coughed up 10 double-faults before mounting her fightback and reeling off 10 straight games in the 2-6 7-5 6-2 victory that booked her date with Williams.

Stosur hasn't played Williams since upstaging the American superstar in a dramatic final in New York on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks last September.

The Queenslander trails Williams 4-3 head-to-head and will be looking to square the ledger to advance to the quarter-finals of the so-called "fifth major" for the third time.

Playing her first tournament since a fourth-round exit at the Australian Open in January, 10th seed Williams trounced Italian Roberta Vinci 6-2 6-1 in her third-round match on Saturday.

While Stosur was savouring her gutsy win, compatriot Bernard Tomic was digesting a straight-sets loss to Spanish fifth seed David Ferrer and facing a possible fine for coaching.

Tomic plans to appeal any possible fine levelled against him after claiming he was merely asking his coach-father John to have some racquets restrung when the chair umpire cautioned him.

Ferrer, who reached the 2005 and 2006 semi-finals, converted four of 10 break-point chances to end Australian interest in the men's draw following the earlier exits of Matt Ebden and wildcard Marinko Matosevic.

DARTS

The former world darts champion Jocky Wilson has died at the age of 62.

Fife police confirmed that Wilson passed away at his home in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, on Saturday night.

Wilson, who won world titles in 1982 and 1989, had recently been suffering with the lung disorder chronic pulmonary obstructive disease.

The Professional Darts Corporation (PDC) said on Twitter: "We are very saddened to hear of the death of former orld champion Jocky Wilson. Simply devastated."

Wilson turned professional in 1979 and enjoyed a stellar career through to his retirement in 1996. He reached at least the quarter-finals of every World Championship between 1979 and 1991 and was a four-time British champion between 1981 and 1988 and a three-time Scottish Masters champion.

Fellow stars from the world of darts paid tribute to Wilson. The two-time World Championship runner-up Bobby George wrote on his Twitter page: "Farewell John Thomas (Jocky) Wilson. We had some great times together will never forget you and your toothless grin! Great #darts #legend"

Wayne Mardle said: "Jocky Wilson the darting legend has passed away. What a character, I loved watching him play."

GOLF

Hank Haney, pilloried for much of the six years he spent working with Tiger Woods, has been ridiculed for peddling gossip and tittle-tattle in his forthcoming book about his relationship with the former world No1, The Big Miss and now he stands accused of breaking the "teacher-player code of confidentiality", reports Lawrence Donegan in The Guardian.

Rick Smith, who has worked with Phil Mickelson among others, became the first of Haney's high-profile colleagues on the driving range to take a public stand against the book, which comes out in the US next week. Golf Digest has been publishing edited "highlights" over the last two weeks, most of which have focused on the personal minutia of Woods' life and opinions rather than, as had been billed, the broader picture of his golfing career.

For instance, Haney claims that Woods called Ian Poulter "a dick" for "mooching" a lift on his private jet; that he was obsessed with the US military and wanted to give up golf to become a Navy SEAL; that he watched porn while sharing a room at the Ryder Cup with Zach Johnson, knowing that Johnson, a born again Christian, would be offended. Haney also makes observations in the book about the relationship between Woods and his then, and now former, wife Elin Nordegren.

In an interview with ESPN.com, Smith was scathing about such disclosures, telling the website: "I would rather be broke and not have a penny to my name before I violate the code of player-teacher confidentiality. In 27 years out here, I've never done that. I'm personally upset with Hank because he's broken and violated our code of ethics. If you have the opportunity and you're privileged to conversations, you will not and should not share anything from them with anyone. I don't care who it is.

"For all the guys who have committed their lives to teaching, this should be very upsetting and I know that I'm not the only one that feels this way. Your relationship with these players is for a lifetime. All the guys that I have worked with are still my dearest friends," Smith said.

Woods has already made his displeasure at the book's appearance clear, having had a terse exchange with one journalist who had the temerity to ask him questions pertaining to its contents.

For his part, Haney has made no public comment, although that is about to change in the next week when he embarks on an extensive publicity and marketing campaign.

In the meantime, there is only the word of the few who have received advance copies of The Big Miss and their suggestions that the already published extracts, while titillating to those who like titillation, misrepresent what is a serious and seriously well-written account of the time Haney spent with Woods.

Even so, the golfer himself, or indeed critics like Rick Smith, is unlikely to change their views if this early review from the US-based magazine Golfweek is anything to go by:

"Among the book's many revelations is Haney's sense that Woods' greatest weakness as a golfer is his fear of mis-hitting the driver - thus the title of the book.

"I can now admit," says Haney, "I never felt totally comfortable when Tiger was standing over a drive in competition."

HAVE YOUR SAY. Agree or disagree? Love or hate? Let us know what you think of this article by leaving a comment below and taking part in Australia's best independent sporting debate.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Rate this article

(6 votes)

Latest articles from Michael Reid


BackPageLead Daily News Feed